USGS - science for a changing world

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

decorativehome decorativeinformation/data decorativeprojects decorativepublications decorativefloodwatch decorativedroughtwatch decorativecontact


Pacific Creek near Farson, WY is usually small enough to jump across. Streamflow on March 20, 2017 was 373 cfs.

Pacific Creek near Farson, WY is usually small enough to jump across. Streamflow on March 20, 2017 was 373 cfs.

 

Connect with USGS science

In Montana

In Wyoming

In Montana

In Wyoming

 

DATA CENTER

  • Current conditions

ABOUT THE WYOMING-MONTANA WATER SCIENCE CENTER

USGS IN YOUR STATE

USGS Water Science Centers are located in each state.

There is a USGS Water Science Center office in each State. Washington Oregon California Idaho Nevada Montana Wyoming Utah Colorado Arizona New Mexico North Dakota South Dakota Nebraska Kansas Oklahoma Texas Minnesota Iowa Missouri Arkansas Louisiana Wisconsin Illinois Mississippi Michigan Indiana Ohio Kentucky Tennessee Alabama Pennsylvania West Virginia Georgia Florida Caribbean Alaska Hawaii New York Vermont New Hampshire Maine Massachusetts South Carolina North Carolina Rhode Island Virginia Connecticut New Jersey Maryland-Delaware-D.C.

Online Publications for Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

The Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center publishes water-information reports on many topics and in many formats. From this Web page, you can locate, view, download, or order scientific and technical articles and reports as well as general interest publications such as booklets, fact sheets, pamphlets, and posters resulting from the research performed by our scientists and partners.


Search iconThe USGS Publications Warehouse contains on-line content and citations for over 100,000 publications. USGS reports published recently are available on-line as html or pdf files for viewing and downloading.

Find out about USGS publication categories. USGS publication categories

A bibliography of Wyoming water resources reports through water year 2007 is available.

Recent Publications

Estimating current and future streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites, central and eastern Montana, with application to evaluating effects of climate change on fish populations

Publication Cover: Estimating current  and future streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites, central and eastern  Montana, with application to evaluating effects of climate change on fish populations

A relatively new technique was used to predict historical and future streamflows under different climate scenarios at 1,707 fish sampling sites across central and eastern Montana. Historical streamflow was predicted at sites near USGS streamgages to determine the accuracy of the model. Comparison between predicted flow in the past and the historical streamflow data recorded at those USGS streamgages had acceptable agreement, indicating confidence in predicting future streamflow scenarios. Fisheries biologists are using the streamflow predictions and fish sample information to understand how climate change might affect fish in small central and eastern Montana streams.

 

Enhanced coal-dependent methanogenesis coupled with algal biofuels: Potential water recycle and carbon capture

Publication Cover: Enhanced coal-dependent methanogenesis coupled  with algal biofuels: Potential water recycle and carbon capture

Many coal beds contain microbial communities that can convert coal to natural gas (coalbed methane). Native microorganisms were obtained from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal seams with a diffusive microbial sampler placed downhole and were used as enrichments nutrients to investigate microbially-enhanced coalbed methane production (MECoM). Details of the amount of methane produced with different nutrients are described. Of note, the use of algae to stimulate methane production has the potential to lead to technologies that utilize coupled biological systems (photosynthesis and methane production) to sustainably enhance CBM production and generate algal biofuels, while also sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2).

 

Sharing Our Data—An Overview of Current (2016) USGS Policies and Practices for Publishing Data on ScienceBase and an Example Interactive Mapping Application

Publication Cover: Sharing Our Data—An  Overview of Current (2016) USGS Policies and Practices for Publishing Data on  ScienceBase and an Example Interactive Mapping Application

Resources for writing data management plans, formatting data, and creating metadata, as well as for data and metadata review, uploading data and metadata to ScienceBase, and sharing metadata through the U.S. Geological Survey Science Data Catalog have been compiled and described in order to guide users needing to comply with current (2016) data publishing policy. Of particular note is the section detailing how ScienceBase, an integrated data sharing platform managed by the U.S. Geological Survey, can be used. Also described is how open source data and R programming can be used to generate interactive maps.

 

Water, bed sediment, and biota were sampled in selected streams from Butte to near Missoula, Montana, as part of a monitoring program in the upper Clark Fork Basin of western Montana. The sampling program was led by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, to characterize aquatic resources in the Clark Fork Basin, with emphasis on trace elements associated with historic mining and smelting activities. Sampling sites were located on the Clark Fork and selected tributaries. Water samples were collected periodically at 20 sites from October 2014 through September 2015. Bed-sediment and biota samples were collected once at 13 sites during August 2015. Statistical summaries of water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data for sites in the upper Clark Fork Basin are provided for the period of record since 1985.

 

Estimated Nitrogen and Phosphorus Inputs to the Fish Creek Watershed, Teton County, Wyoming, 2009–15

Publication Cover: Estimated Nitrogen and Phosphorus Inputs to the Fish Creek Watershed, Teton County, Wyoming, 2009-15

Nitrogen and phosphorus are essential nutrients for plant and animal growth, but the overabundance of bioavailable nitrogen and phosphorus in water can cause adverse health and ecological effects. Recent studies of the Fish Creek watershed in west-central Wyoming have indicated a greater biovolume of aquatic plants than is typically observed in streams of similar size in Wyoming, and data indicate it is likely because of increased nitrogen and phosphorus inputs into the watershed. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District, recently identified and quantified the sources and inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus to the Fish Creek watershed. The east-southeastern part of the watershed has the greatest input of nitrogen and phosphorus, which corresponds with the human activities that add additional nutrients to the watershed. The largest inputs for a 10-acre cell generally are associated with sewage treatment plant injection sites, livestock waste, and distributed land use where septic systems and fertilized lawns are located.

 

Effects of Flow Regime on Metal Concentrations and the Attainment of Water Quality Standards in a Remediated Stream Reach, Butte, Montana

Publication Cover: Effects of Flow Regime on Metal Concentrations and the Attainment of Water Quality Standards in a Remediated Stream Reach, Butte, Montana

Sampling during low-flow conditions is the most common approach for characterizing water quality in streams affected by mining. While this type of sampling is an invaluable part of site characterization, investigations which focus solely on low-flow conditions may yield incomplete and sometimes misleading results. A recently completed study, which involved sampling before and during a rainstorm, demonstrated this point.  During the low-flow period prior to the rainstorm, concentrations of most constituents met aquatic standards.  However, sampling during higher flow, which had been augmented by rainfall runoff, showed that metal concentrations were 2–23 times higher than the concentrations observed during low-flow sampling. The possible mechanisms responsible for the increase in metal concentrations as well as other findings from the study are described.

 

Changes in streamflow associated with long-term climate change may render some streams in the Northern Great Plains uninhabitable for current fish species. To better understand future hydrology of these prairie streams, the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System model and RegCM3 Regional Climate model were used to simulate streamflow for seven watersheds in eastern and central Montana, for a baseline period and three future periods.

 

The Northern Patagonia Icefield (NPI) is the primary glaciated terrain worldwide at its latitude (46.5–47.5°S), and constraining its glacial history provides unique information for reconstructing Southern Hemisphere paleoclimate. The Colonia Glacier is the largest outlet glacier draining the eastern NPI. Ages were determined using dendrochronology, lichenometry, radiocarbon, cosmogenic 10Be and optically stimulated luminescence.

 

Water-Quality Trends and Constituent-Transport Analysis for Selected Sampling Sites in the Milltown/Clark Fork River Superfund Site in the upper Clark Fork Basin, Montana, Water Years 1996-2015

Publication Cover: Water-Quality Trends and Constituent-Transport Analysis for Selected Sampling Sites in the Milltown/Clark Fork River Superfund Site in the upper Clark Fork Basin, Montana, Water Years 1996-2015

During the extended history of mining in the upper Clark Fork Basin in Montana, large amounts of waste materials enriched with metallic contaminants (cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc) and the metalloid trace element arsenic were generated from mining operations near Butte and milling and smelting operations near Anaconda. The USGS, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, completed a study to analyze trends on specific conductance, selected trace elements (arsenic, copper, and zinc), and suspended sediment for seven sampling sites in the Milltown Reservoir/Clark Fork River Superfund Site for water years 1996–2015.

 

Montana StreamStats

Publication Cover: Montana StreamStats

StreamStats is a Web-based geographic information system application that was created by the USGS to provide users with access to an assortment of analytical tools that are useful for water-resource planning and management. StreamStats allows users to easily obtain streamflow and basin characteristics for USGS streamflow-gaging stations and user-selected locations on ungaged streams. The USGS, in cooperation with Montana Department of Transportation, Montana Department of Environmental Quality, and Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, completed a study to develop a StreamStats application for Montana, compute streamflow characteristics at streamflow-gaging stations, and develop regional regression equations to estimate streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites.

USGS Home Water Climate Change Core Science Ecosystems Energy and Minerals Env. Health Hazards

Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

Take Pride in America logo USA.gov logo U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
URL: http://wy-mt.water.usgs.gov/publications/index.html
Page Contact Information: webmaster@usgs.gov
Page Last Modified: Friday, 31-Mar-2017 14:13:35 EDT